TITLE

DHS rules tackle security

AUTHOR(S)
Kamaliclick, Joe; Gibson, Jane
PUB. DATE
April 2007
SOURCE
ICIS Chemical Business;4/9/2007, Vol. 2 Issue 61, p6
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article reports that the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) issued the final rules enabling it to implement an antiterrorist site security law. The law establishes the first federal mandate for protecting high-risk chemical facilities from terrorist attacks. It requires owners of units that produce, store or use certain quantities of hazardous chemicals to submit an assessment of their sites' vulnerability and the risks posed to adjacent communities.
ACCESSION #
25082008

 

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