New University Data Center Supported With Modular, Scalable Architecture

April 2007
Heating/Piping/Air Conditioning Engineering;Apr2007, Vol. 79 Issue 4, p58
The article offers information on the cooling architecture for a data center of the University of Texas Health Science Center. The data center is located on the roof of a university-owned parking garage in Houston, Texas. The facility's designing team decided to install three chillers for reasons of flexibility, having two chillers running at any one time. INSET: Data-Center Best Practices.


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