TITLE

The Week

PUB. DATE
September 1940
SOURCE
New Republic;9/16/40, Vol. 103 Issue 12, p367
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents news briefs concerning U.S. and international politics for the week of September 16, 1940. The bombing of civilians by German forces in Great Britain is criticized. The political campaigns between Wendell Willkie and Franklin D. Roosevelt for U.S. president are discussed. The political persecution of the U.S. Communist party is explored.
ACCESSION #
25077050

 

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