TITLE

CHIPLESS RFID

AUTHOR(S)
Das, Raghu
PUB. DATE
May 2007
SOURCE
Adhesives & Sealants Industry;May2007, Vol. 14 Issue 5, p47
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article offers information on chipless radio frequency identification (RFID) tags. It is mentioned that chipless tags are those RFID tags that do not contain a silicon chip and could be printed directly on products and packaging for 1¢. The author reveals that chipless tags' versatility and reliability could replace 10 trillion barcodes annually. The author suggests that chipless tags are best applied on books at manufacture, pharmaceutical, consumer goods and air baggage.
ACCESSION #
25050351

 

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