TITLE

Household brands counterpunch

AUTHOR(S)
Neff, Jack
PUB. DATE
November 1999
SOURCE
Advertising Age;11/1/1999, Vol. 70 Issue 45, p26
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article discusses the trend within household products industry in the U.S. to use direct comparison advertisements as category competition intensifies, as of November 1999. In recent months, direct-comparisons are surging in such categories as food storage bags, paper towels, paper plates and disinfectant sprays as rivals slug it out. Clorox Co., via DDB Worldwide, has taken the offensive against Reckitt & Colman's Lysol spray in advertisements claiming its Clorox disinfectant keeps surfaces free of some bacteria for up to 24 hours while Lysol doesn't. Direct-comparison advertisements are nothing new. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission first permitted them in the mid 1970s and they've become a staple in such categories as batteries and antacids. The rise in direct-comparison advertisements has meant 80 percent of complaints to the National Advertising Division of the Council of Better Business Bureaus now come from marketers. But marketers are turning more to direct comparisons now because they work in crowded categories with me-too-products.
ACCESSION #
2489685

 

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