TITLE

Vaccine Metamorphosis

AUTHOR(S)
Barron, Rachel
PUB. DATE
April 2007
SOURCE
Red Herring;4/23/2007, Vol. 4 Issue 15, p8
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents information on the development of a seasonal flu vaccine grown in caterpillar larvae's cell lines. According to a study published in the April 2007 issue of the "Journal of the American Medical Association," the vaccine is safe and effective as traditional vaccines. It is stated that the new approach could promote an old method of vaccine production that may not meet increased demand during emergency situations. It is informed that the main benefit of using cell-based production is that it allows for a faster startup of vaccine manufacturing and is helpful in the event of an influenza pandemic.
ACCESSION #
24879926

 

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