TITLE

Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance: Predictors of Malignant Transformation and Recognition of an Evolving Type Characterized by a Progressive Increase in M Protein Size

AUTHOR(S)
Rosiñol, Laura; Cibeira, Teresa; Montoto, Silvia; Rozman, Maria; Esteve, Jordi; Filella, Xavier; Blade, Joan; Md
PUB. DATE
April 2007
SOURCE
Mayo Clinic Proceedings;Apr2007, Vol. 82 Issue 4, p428
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
OBJECTIVE: To investigate the predictors of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) by considering not only the initial features but also the pattern of evolution of the M protein during the first years after diagnosis. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This study consisted of 359 patients diagnosed as having MGUS at a single institution. Patients who showed a definite and progressive increase in their M protein size according to serum electrophoresis during the first 3 years of follow-up were considered to have evolving MGUS, whereas all others were considered to have nonevolving MGUS. RESULTS: Of the 359 patients, 330 had nonevolving MGUS, whereas 29 fulfilled the criteria for evolving MGUS. Overall, 32 patients developed malignant transformation. The progression rates at 10 and 20 years of follow-up for the evolving and the nonevolving types were 55% vs 10% and 80% vs 13%, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed that the features significantly associated with a higher risk of progression were evolving MGUS (relative risk [RR], 12.14; P<.001), IgA MGUS (RR, 2.93; P=-.O06), and M protein concentration (RR, 2.18; P=-.04). CONCLUSION: The evolutionary pattern of serum M protein (progressive increasing vs stable) during the first years of follow-up is the most important risk factor for disease progression in patients with MGUS.
ACCESSION #
24851315

 

Related Articles

  • Comment on “Clinical Comparisons of Two Free Light Chain Assays to Immunofixation Electrophoresis for Detecting Monoclonal Gammopathy”. Parker, Antony R.; Berlanga, Oscar; Harding, Stephen // BioMed Research International;3/12/2015, Vol. 2015, p1 

    No abstract available.

  • MGUS and Myeloma May Predispose to Venous Thromboembolism. Artz, Andrew S. // Clinical Oncology Alert;Dec2008, Vol. 24 Issue 12, p92 

    Recent studies have suggested that multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) may predispose to venous thromboembolism, even in untreated patients. The authors retrospectively reviewed Veteran Affairs hospital discharge records from 1980 to 1996 for the diagnosis...

  • Urine Protein Electrophoresis and Immunoelectrophoresis Using Unconcentrated or Minimally Concentrated Urine Samples. Anja Roden; Karen Lockington; Linda Tostrud; Jerry Katzmann // American Journal of Clinical Pathology;Jul2008, Vol. 130 Issue 1, p141 

    Our objective was to evaluate a gel system that uses unconcentrated urine specimens for protein electrophoresis (PEL) and immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) in patients with monoclonal gammopathies. For the study, 222 urine specimens were analyzed by our current PEL method (Helena...

  • Urine Protein Electrophoresis and Immunoelectrophoresis Using Unconcentrated or Minimally Concentrated Urine Samples. Anja Roden; Karen Lockington; Linda Tostrud; Jerry Katzmann // American Journal of Clinical Pathology;Jul2008, Vol. 130 Issue 1, p141 

    Our objective was to evaluate a gel system that uses unconcentrated urine specimens for protein electrophoresis (PEL) and immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) in patients with monoclonal gammopathies. For the study, 222 urine specimens were analyzed by our current PEL method (Helena...

  • Reduced-intensity conditioning 2/Tolerance and rejection.  // Bone Marrow Transplantation;Mar2005 Supplement 2, Vol. 35, p69 

    The article focuses on reduced-intensity conditioning. Increasing patient age is a well-established risk factor for the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is generally assumed that patients aged 50 years or older are candidates for reduced-intensity conditioning...

  • Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance: Genetic vs Environmental Etiologies. Munshi, Nikhil C. // Mayo Clinic Proceedings;Dec2007, Vol. 82 Issue 12, p1457 

    The article presents the different study that asserts the prevalence and growth rate of monoclonal gamopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). The study was administered in different population and countries with distinct environmental characteristics wherein ethnic differences and genetic...

  • Detection by Immunofixation of M Proteins in Hypogammaglobulinemic Patients With Normal Serum Protein Electrophoresis Results. Renuka Lakshminarayanan; Yueju Li; Kim Janatpour; Laurel Beckett; Ishwarlal Jialal // American Journal of Clinical Pathology;May2007, Vol. 127 Issue 5, p746 

    Serum protein electrophoresis (SPE) demonstrates a monoclonal protein as an M spike in the majority of patients with monoclonal gammopathies. However, in patients with an apparently normal SPE pattern or hypogammaglobulinemia, immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) can reveal an M protein. We...

  • Paraprotein management. Smellie, W. Stuart A.; Spickett, Gavin P. // BMJ: British Medical Journal (International Edition);7/22/2006, Vol. 333 Issue 7560, p185 

    We present two cases illustrating the use of electrophoresis in the diagnosis and monitoring of plasma cell dyscrasias. The presence of monoclonal protein bands (paraproteins) in myeloma is well recognised; other conditions in which paraproteins may be seen are less well understood, as is the...

  • Monoclonal gammopathies. Tozzi, S. // BMC Geriatrics;2010 Supplement 1, Vol. 10, Special section p1 

    Clinical background The finding of a monoclonal immunoglobulin in the serum defines the so-called monoclonal gammopathy. Monoclonal components are homogeneus immunoglobulins whole (intact) or fragmented, produced by a single expanded plasma cell clone. MCs present unique physicochemical...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics