TITLE

Electroconvulsive Therapy and Depression III. A Method for Prognosis

AUTHOR(S)
Mendels, J.
PUB. DATE
August 1965
SOURCE
British Journal of Psychiatry;Aug65, Vol. 111 Issue 477, p687
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents a study which investigates the use of electroconvulsive therapy (E.C.T.) in determining the prognosis of mental depression. The study included 50 depressed patients who were given E.C.T. The severity of the symptoms was rated on a Depression Rating Scale and they were seen for examination of the response to treatment after one or three months. The results indicated that reactive depression does not respond well to E.C.T. compared to endogenous depression. Good prognosis was present in 6 patients with endogenous depression and 9 with reactive depression. Linear Program results showed that there is a blurred division between endogenous and reactive depression.
ACCESSION #
24758433

 

Related Articles

  • ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY AND DEPRESSION. I. THE PROGNOSTIC SIGNIFICANCE OF CLINICAL FACTORS. Mendels, J. // British Journal of Psychiatry;Aug65, Vol. 111 Issue 477, p675 

    The article presents a study which examines the clinical factors affecting the response of depression to electroconvulsive therapy (E.C.T.). The study included fifty-tree consecutive in-patients whose primary symptom was depression and who were referred for E.C.T. The severity of depression was...

  • ELECTROCONVULSIVE THERAPY AND DEPRESSION. II. SIGNIGICANCE OF ENDOGENOUS AND REACTIVE SYNDROMES. Mendels, J. // British Journal of Psychiatry;Aug65, Vol. 111 Issue 477, p682 

    The article presents a study which investigates the relationship between the response of endogenous and reactive depression to electroconvulsive therapy. The study included fifty patients with depression as the central symptom and who were referred for E.C.T. The total number of endogenous and...

  • Recovery from ECT in elderly patients. Fraser, R. M.; Glass, I. B. // British Journal of Psychiatry;Dec78, Vol. 133, p524 

    Nine elderly depressed patients were given ECT in courses which alternated unilateral and bilateral electrode placement; recovery times were measured. When compared with similar times for younger patients, recovery took on average five times as long from unilateral treatment and nine times as...

  • The onset and rate of the antidepressant effect of electroconvulsive therapy. A neglected topic of research. Scott, Allan I.F.; Whalley, Lawrence J.; Scott, A I; Whalley, L J // British Journal of Psychiatry;Jun93, Vol. 162, p725 

    The article discusses the lack of research about the onset and rate of the antidepressant effect of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in Great Britain. The selection of depressed patients who will receive ECT and the recommended ECT practice have significantly changed. All depressed patients who...

  • Development of a questionnaire-based decision rule for classifying depressed patients. Pilowsky, I.; Boulton, D. M. // British Journal of Psychiatry;Jun70, Vol. 116 Issue 535, p647 

    The article discusses the development of a questionnaire-based decision rule for classifying depressed patients. A total of 45 patients were classified into class A, B and C. Class A comprised of mixed group of reactive depressions, Class B corresponded to endogenous depression while Class C...

  • Treatment of depression: a comparative study of E.C.T. and six drugs. Hutchinson, John T.; Smedberg, Daphne; HUTCHINSON, J T; SMEDBERG, D // British Journal of Psychiatry;Jul63, Vol. 109 Issue 461, p536 

    The article presents a comparative study of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) and six drugs in the treatment of depression. Seven treatments for depression have been evaluated by a blind technique in a series of 200 female in-patients. The treatments given were ECT, phenelzine, imipramine,...

  • A physiological comparison of 'endogenous' and 'reactive' depression. Noble, Peter; Lader, Malcolm; Noble, P; Lader, M // British Journal of Psychiatry;May72, Vol. 120 Issue 558, p541 

    The article presents a study conducted to 34 Maudsley Hospital in-patients with severe depressive illness in London, England to warrant the use of Electro-Convulsive Therapy (ECT). Prior to the research, all drugs, apart from night sedation, were said to have been stopped for at least ten days....

  • Which depressed patients will respond to electroconvulsive therapy? The search for biological predictors of recovery. Scott, Allan I. F.; Scott, A I // British Journal of Psychiatry;Jan89, Vol. 154, p8 

    A small yet significant minority of contemporary patients with endogenous depressive illness who are treated with electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) gain little or no benefit. It is argued that the use of clinical features alone may not improve the ability to predict outcome after ECT. Many...

  • Palmar digital sweating in women suffering from depression. Bagg, C. E.; Crookes, T. G. // British Journal of Psychiatry;Dec66, Vol. 112 Issue 493, p1251 

    The article presents a study that examines differences in sweating of depressed patients using the data from electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Subjects of the study were eighteen female patients suffering from depression and were having a course of ECT. The measurement of the patients' sweat was...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics