TITLE

Multimedia consent helps with pediatric patients

PUB. DATE
March 2007
SOURCE
Healthcare Risk Management;Mar2007, Vol. 29 Issue 3, p31
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
A new web-based informed consent system can help ensure the parents of pediatric patients receive all necessary information. The system is based on a similar one used for adult patients. • The system is intended to supplement a one-on-one conversation, not replace it. • Users can go back and review information as needed. • Risk managers could see a benefit from less litigation tied to informed consent claims.
ACCESSION #
24729735

 

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