TITLE

The Impact of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Work-Hour Regulations on the Surgical Experience of Orthopaedic Surgery Residents

AUTHOR(S)
Pappas, Alexander J.; Teague, David C.
PUB. DATE
April 2007
SOURCE
Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, American Volume;Apr2007, Vol. 89-A Issue 4, p904
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background: The advent of the eighty-hour workweek regulations generated a great deal of controversy over the potential loss of operative experience for general surgery and surgical specialty residents. We believed an investigation to review the operative experience of orthopaedic surgery residents before and after the adoption of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education duty-hour guidelines would provide important information in this debate. Methods: The total number of surgical Current Procedural Terminology codes logged in the case-log database of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education by each second through fifth year orthopaedic resident at a single university-based program was collected from July 1, 2001, to June 30, 2005. Two groups were created from the data obtained. Group I (thirty-nine residents) included surgical codes logged for the two years prior to the implementation of the eighty-hour workweek (July 1, 2003), while Group II (forty residents) included the codes for the following two years. The average number of codes was determined for Group I and Group II. The two groups were then subdivided by postgraduate year of training. The average number of surgical codes per training year was calculated. Then the second and third year (junior) resident and fourth and fifth year (senior) resident groups were combined to create two subgroups. The mean number of surgical codes was determined for each group, and the groups were compared. Results: The surgical case logs of thirty-five orthopaedic residents were reviewed during the study period. One resident left the program during the first year of the study and was excluded because of incomplete data. A total of 36,464 surgical codes were logged. The average yearly number of surgical codes per resident was 461.4. The average total number of coded procedures per resident before and after the start of the eighty-hour workweek were 455.4 and 467.3, respectively. The average yearly number of surgical codes was 432.5 for the junior residents and 491.1 for the senior residents. The average number of codes logged before and after the start of the eighty-hour workweek were 407.3 and 455.3, respectively, for the junior residents compared with 501.2 and 480.6 for the senior residents. No significant differences between the groups in any category were identified. Conclusion: Although many aspects of surgical training may be affected by the new work-hour restrictions, our review of the operative experience of orthopaedic surgery residents at a single institution demonstrated no significant differences before and after the implementation of the eighty-hour workweek.
ACCESSION #
24694025

 

Related Articles

  • Fewer Hours, Fewer Errors? COMMINS, JOHN // HealthLeaders Magazine;Nov2008, Vol. 11 Issue 11, p51 

    The article reports on the implementation of an 80-hour workweek for medical residents by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) to reduce committing fatigue-related medical errors. "Pediatrics" magazine published a study which reviewed the work habits of 220 residents...

  • The trainee's tale.  // BMJ: British Medical Journal;10/13/2012, Vol. 345 Issue 7878, p18 

    The article describes Simone Speggiorin's work at Narayana Hrudayalaya Hospital in Bangalore. Speggiorin worked more than 12 hours a day, six days a week at the hospital in Bangalore, performing three or four operations a day. A paediatric cardiac surgeon from Padua University in Italy,...

  • Trainee doctors may miss out on the robotic revolution. Magos, Tiarnan // BMJ: British Medical Journal (Overseas & Retired Doctors Edition;11/12/2011, Vol. 343 Issue 7831, p996 

    A letter to the editor is presented in response to the article "Robots in Theatre: Tomorrow's World?," by G. Watts in the October 18, 2011 issue.

  • Departmental divisions and the crisis in undergraduate medical education. Richards, Peter // British Medical Journal (Clinical Research Edition);5/7/1988, Vol. 296 Issue 6632, p1278 

    Investigates the crisis in undergraduate medical education. Responsibility of the Department of Education and Science in funding preclinical medical education and clinical academic staff; Lack of coordination between the DES and the Department of Health and Social Security; Casualty of staff...

  • Staffing dispute in Bristol trust hospital. Fleming, Charlotte // BMJ: British Medical Journal (International Edition);7/25/92, Vol. 305 Issue 6847, p210 

    Focuses on the dispute regarding the medical staffing levels at the Bristol trust hospital in England. Implications of dispute for low level hospital staffs; Awareness of the board on the problems related to staffing; Emphasis on medical education.

  • The Questionnaire D-RECT German: Adaptation and testtheoretical properties of an instrument for Evaluation of the learning climate in medical specialist training. Iblher, Peter; Zupanic, M.; Ostermann, T. // GMS Zeitschrift für Medizinische Ausbildung;2015, Vol. 32 Issue 5, p1 

    Aim: Boor et al [1] developed and validated the questionnaire D-RECT (Dutch Residency Educational Climate Test) to measure the clinical learning environment within the medical specialist training. In this study, a German version of this questionnaire (D-RECT German) is analyzed regarding...

  • Could a passage to India be the way to get more surgical experience? Davies, Peter // BMJ: British Medical Journal;10/13/2012, Vol. 345 Issue 7878, p18 

    The article discusses that doctors who perform more surgical operations have a lot of practical knowledge and experience. The doctors should avail the surgical experiences so that they can perform more surgeries in a day and with great ease. The surgeons in India are provided a good amount of...

  • VIDEO GAMERS BEST RESIDENTS IN VIRTUAL SURGERY.  // Urology Times;Dec2012, Vol. 40 Issue 13, p58 

    The article reports on the result of a study from the University of Texas Medical Brach at Galveston which unveils that high school-and college-age video game players are better virtual surgeons compared to medical residents.

  • THE ORTHOPAEDIC FORUM. Bernstein, Adam D.; Jazrawi, Laith M.; Elbeshbeshy, Basil; Ddlla Valle, Craig J.; Zuckerman, Joseph D. // Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery, American Volume;Nov2002, Vol. 84-A Issue 11, p2090 

    Focuses on the selection process of applicants for orthopedic residency programs. Academic criteria used by the program directors in the recruitment process; Ranking of twenty-six resident-selection criteria based on the results of a questionnaire completed by the directors; Ethics and...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics