TITLE

WOMEN, DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, AND POSTTRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER (PTSD)

AUTHOR(S)
Hughes, Margaret J.; Jones, Loring
PUB. DATE
October 2000
SOURCE
Family Therapy: The Journal of the California Graduate School of;2000, Vol. 27 Issue 3, p125
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
According to estimates from a national survey, 1.9 million women are raped or physically assaulted by a partner annually in the United States (Tjaden & Thoennes, 1998). Patterns suggest that 50% of women will be victims of domestic violence at some point in their lives (Corsilles, 1994). Thirty-one to 42% of all female homicides are the result of domestic violence (Corsilles, 1994; Gross, 1997). Despite these and other published data, exact counts of the extent of domestic violence are difficult to determine as victims are often reluctant to file a report due to a complex set of factors including fear, hope that the partner will change, lack of options, financial concerns, cultural factors, or pressure from others in their social network. The most common diagnosis by mental health professionals for battered women is Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) (Crowell & Burgess, 1996). However, the typical treatment strategies for battered women are not those developed for PTSD. A study commissioned by the California State University Faculty Fellows Program in cooperation with the California Governor's Office supports this mismatch of treatment for battered women experiencing PTSD.
ACCESSION #
24666245

Tags: WOMEN -- Psychology;  FAMILY violence;  ABUSED women;  POST-traumatic stress disorder

 

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