TITLE

A Day Among Fringe Dwellers

PUB. DATE
September 1979
SOURCE
Social Alternatives;Sep79, Vol. 1 Issue 5, p72
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article describes the author's visits to camps and other areas where homeless Aborigines congregate. The squalid conditions of some of the camps and the hopelessness of the inhabitants is discussed. Most of the Aborigines spend their days drinking and in a drunken stupor because they have nothing else to do and the drinking helps them forget their disappointments and rejections. Many try to get jobs, but are usually unsuccessful. One camp run by Sister Bernardine is orderly and the inhabitants seem to have a purpose that gives them self-respect. The author also discusses the norm of reciprocity that exists among the black Aborigines and keeps them looking after each other.
ACCESSION #
24646285

 

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