TITLE

THE TEXTUAL BASIS OF THE PRESIDENT'S FOREIGN AFFAIRS POWER

AUTHOR(S)
Ramsey, Michael D.
PUB. DATE
September 2006
SOURCE
Harvard Journal of Law & Public Policy;Fall2006, Vol. 30 Issue 1, p141
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The author discusses the textual basis of foreign affairs power given to a president of the U.S. He notes that the presidential power is sometimes divided into the external executive and internal executive. He also adds that former President George Washington exercised the foreign affairs functions that were not specifically mentioned in the Constitution. He suggests maintaining a rule of law in foreign affairs by adhering to the eighteenth-century meaning of executive power.
ACCESSION #
24524165

 

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