TITLE

ASIA EMBRACES GM FOR FUEL AND FOOD

AUTHOR(S)
Kovac, Matt
PUB. DATE
March 2007
SOURCE
ICIS Chemical Business;3/12/2007, Vol. 2 Issue 57, p15
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the interest of Asian countries in planting and importing genetically modified (GM) crops. Information on China's biotechnology research plan is presented, and the status of Thailand's research into GM cotton and papaya is reported. Asian countries want GM crops to not only fuel transport, but also to feed their people.
ACCESSION #
24510152

 

Related Articles

  • Editorial: Much ado about nothing. Bright, Simon; Poole, Nigel // Journal of Commercial Biotechnology;Jan2006, Vol. 12 Issue 2, p83 

    The article reflects on the effects of growing and commercializing genetically modified (GM) crops in Europe. It questions how it came to pass that from a position of scientific leadership in crop biotechnology, Great Britain and the rest of Europe have reacted by turning its back on the growing...

  • The Hidden Cost of Genetic Engineering. Aberget, Elisabeth // Alive: Canada's Natural Health & Wellness Magazine;Jul2002, Issue 237, p18 

    Examines the economic impact of using genetically engineered crops. Comparison of profits made by farmers versus biotechnology firms; Market losses incurred by Canadian wheat farmers; Distribution of genetically modified seeds to Afghanistan farmers.

  • EU study leaks a GM truth.  // Ecologist;Jul/Aug2002, Vol. 32 Issue 6, p8 

    Reports that farmers would face higher and, in some cases, unsustainable production costs if the large-scale cultivation of genetically modified (GM) crops went ahead in Europe, according to a study. Predicted rise of farming costs as a result of commercialization of GM oilseed rape, maize and...

  • Development of Agriculture Biotechnology in Pakistan. Zafar, Yusuf // Journal of AOAC International;Sep/Oct2007, Vol. 90 Issue 5, p1500 

    The article reports developments in agriculture biotechnology in Pakistan. According to the author, Pakistan has made considerable progress in the research and development sector of agriculture biotechnology. The country has developed various genetically modified crops, however they remain...

  • Scary Food. Miller, Henry I.; Conko, Gregory // Policy Review;Jun/Jul2006, Issue 137, p61 

    Defends biotechnology used in genetically modifying crops and foods. Measures taken by companies to avoid food biotechnology, gene-splicing and genetic modification; Overview of all-natural contaminants taken from packaged food products and unprocessed crops; Advantages of genetically-modified...

  • Biotech seeds sprout. De Guzman, Doris // Chemical Market Reporter;1/16/2006, Vol. 269 Issue 2, p20 

    The article reports developments and discusses the implications of the global acceptance of genetically modified (GM) oilseeds. Further studies has been conducted on developing new and higher-value traits of GM products not only for food but also for pharmaceutical and industrial applications....

  • Question still remains over GM crop benefits. Tasker, Johann; Riley, Jonathan // Farmers Weekly;7/11/2003, Vol. 139 Issue 2, p12 

    Reports on the conclusion of a British governmental investigation into the benefits and costs of allowing commercial production of genetically modified crops, as of July 2003. Impact of the technology on the farming industry; Various reactions to the issue.

  • Gov't Report Urges Testing for GM Foods. Budgar, Laurie // Natural Foods Merchandiser;Sep2004, Vol. 25 Issue 9, p6 

    Reports on the National Academy of Sciences' recommendation that genetically modified foods should be tested for potential health effects both before and after the products become available to consumers in the U.S. Assessment of the possible health effects of genetic modification; Reasons of the...

  • Victory in GE wheat debate.  // Alive: Canada's Natural Health & Wellness Magazine;Jul2004, Issue 261, p14 

    Announces the decision of biotechnology firm Monsanto to pull its plans to introduce their genetically engineered wheat into the Canadian market. Commercial reasons leading to the decision.

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics