TITLE

PLAY IT COOL

PUB. DATE
March 2007
SOURCE
Marketing Health Services;Spring2007, Vol. 27 Issue 1, p6
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the development of a virtual-reality video game specifically for children who are suffering from burns. Hunter Hoffman is the video game designer. The game is entitled "SnowWorld" and Hoffman intends for the Arctic setting to offer the children some fun and distraction. Research proved that college students suffering from mild pain experienced lower activity in their brains' pain centers when playing Hoffman's game. The game will be used with pediatric burn victims since adult pain relieving methods are not appropriate.
ACCESSION #
24445157

 

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