TITLE

The Bus Stops Here

AUTHOR(S)
Nuechterlein, James
PUB. DATE
November 1999
SOURCE
First Things: A Monthly Journal of Religion & Public Life;Nov1999, Issue 97, p13
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Focuses on the role of school busing system in achieving school system racial balance in the United States. Termination of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg School District busing system in North Carolina; Cities certified as officially desegregated; Impact of racial balance on education of black children; Implications on civil rights movements.
ACCESSION #
2441758

 

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