TITLE

Becoming an Officer of Consequence

AUTHOR(S)
Ratcliff, Ronald E.
PUB. DATE
January 2007
SOURCE
JFQ: Joint Force Quarterly;Winter2007, Issue 44, p65
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the traits needed to become an officer of consequence in the U.S. military. These officers are subordinates whose judgment and counsel are heard when making difficult decisions. Achieving the role requires a mix of professional skills and personal traits. The special challenges the officers' face, expectations of commanders and how an officer will present their opinion is also presented.
ACCESSION #
24272843

 

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