TITLE

THE GOVERNMENTAL ATTORNEY-CLIENT PRIVILEGE: WHETHER THE RIGHT TO EVIDENCE IN A STATE GRAND JURY INVESTIGATION PIERCES THE PRIVILEGE IN NEW YORK STATE

AUTHOR(S)
Newman, Stacy Lynn
PUB. DATE
February 2007
SOURCE
Albany Law Review;2007, Vol. 70 Issue 2, p741
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article focuses on whether New York State supports the extension of the evidentiary attorney-client privilege to state government officials represented by government attorneys who are under investigation by a grand jury. The ethical obligation exists regardless of the nature or source of the information. In contrast, the evidentiary attorney-client privilege applies only to matters communicated by a client to his counsel in confidence and is waived when the communication is disclose to a third person.
ACCESSION #
24255452

 

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