TITLE

The effect of a donor's history of active substance on outcomes following orthotopic heart transplantation

AUTHOR(S)
Shea, Kenneth J.; Sopko, Nikolai A; Ludrosky, Kristin; Hoercher, Katherine; Smedira, Nicholas G.; Taylor, David O.; Starling, Randall C.; Gonzalez-Stawinski, Gonzalo V.
PUB. DATE
March 2007
SOURCE
European Journal of Cardio-Thoracic Surgery;Mar2007, Vol. 31 Issue 3, p452
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Abstract: Objective: To review the short-term and long-term outcomes of using heart donors with a history of substance abuse. Methods: Retrospective chart review was performed of heart recipients over an 8-year span. Charts provided demographics, mechanisms of donor death, and history of substance abuse. Additionally, charts were quarried for post-operative echocardiography and coronary angiogram results, serologic tests, and survival. Results: Between January 1997 and December 2005, 689 heart transplants were performed, 150 (21.8%) had a history positive for substance abuse. The mean donor age was 34.5 years (range 16–62 years); most common cause of death was traumatic head injury in 87 donors (58.0%). Most patients (76.0%) had a history of 1 ppd smoking for ≥5 years, 89 (59.3%) had a history of inhaled drug use, 75 (50.0%) alcohol abuse, and 12 (8.0%) intravenous drug use. At a mean follow-up of 8.3 days, 68 hearts (45.3%) had normal, 36 (24.0%) mild, 23 (15.3%) moderate, and 10 (6.7%) severe ventricular dysfunction by echocardiography. Furthermore, 110 hearts (73.3%) had normal coronaries, 20 (13.3%) had mild, and 2 (1.3%) had evidence of moderate coronary artery disease (CAD) on coronary angiogram at a mean follow-up of 9.8 months (range 0.1–43.7 months). All recipients who received organs from known hepatitis B, or C positive, donors converted to positive serologies. Overall post-transplant survival for the group was 89.8% at a mean follow up of 43.3 months (range 5.8–108.6 months). Conclusions: A history of donor substance abuse does not have a negative impact on overall survival, cardiac function, risk of transplant associated coronary artery disease (TCAD). In patients who receive organs from virus positive donors, the risk of viral conversion is high, but survival seems not to be influenced.
ACCESSION #
24141312

 

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