TITLE

Rhinovirus-Associated Hospitalizations in Young Children

AUTHOR(S)
Miller, E. Kathryn; Xiaoyan Lu; Erdman, Dean D.; Poehling, Katherine A.; Yuwei Zhu; Griffin, Marie R.; Hartert, Tina V.; Anderson, Larry J.; Weinberg, Geoffrey A.; Hall, Caroline B.; Iwane, Marika K.; Edwards, Kathryn M.
PUB. DATE
March 2007
SOURCE
Journal of Infectious Diseases;3/15/2007, Vol. 195 Issue 6, p773
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background. Rhinoviruses frequently cause the common cold but have not been considered important causes of acute respiratory hospitalizations in children. Methods. A population-based surveillance study was performed among children <5 years of age who were hospitalized with respiratory symptoms or fever and who resided within counties encompassing Nashville, Tennessee, or Rochester, New York, from October 2000 through September 2001. Data collected included questionnaires, nasal and throat swabs for viral culture and polymerase chain reaction testing, and chart review. Rates of rhinovirus-associated hospitalizations were calculated. Results. Of 592 children enrolled, 156 (26%) were rhinovirus positive, representing 4.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], 4.3-5.2) rhinovirus-associated hospitalizations/1000 children. Age- specific rates per 1000 children were 17.6 (95% CI, 14.9-20.6) for 0-5-month olds, 6.0 (95% CI, 5.0-7.0) for 6-23-month-olds, and 2.0 (95% CI, 1.6, 2.4) for 24-59-month-olds (P<0.1). Children with a history of wheezing/asthma had significantly more rhinovirus- P<.01 associated hospitalizations than those without a history (25.3/1000 children [95% CI, 21.6-29.5/1000 children] vs. 3.1/1000 children [95% CI, 2.7-3.5/1000 children]). Conclusions. Rhinoviruses were associated with nearly 5 hospitalizations/1000 children <5 years of age and were highest in children with a history of wheezing/asthma.
ACCESSION #
24092525

 

Related Articles

  • DETECTION OF BACTERIA IN SPUTUM FOLLOWING EXPERIMENTAL RHINOVIRUS INFECTION IS MORE COMMON IN COPD THAN CONTROLS SUBJECTS. Footitt, J. I. M.; Mallia, P.; Trujillo-Torralbo, M. B.; Jepson, A.; Johnston, S. L. // Thorax;Dec2011 Supplement, pA10 

    Introduction and Objectives There is increasing evidence that the majority of acute exacerbations of COPD (AECOPD) are caused by virus infection, and rhinoviruses are the most frequently identified species. Bacteria are also responsible for AECOPD but the relationship between these two is poorly...

  • The Role of Respiratory Viruses in the Pathogenesis of Pediatric Asthma. Velissariou, Ioanna M.; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G. // Pediatric Annals;Sep2006, Vol. 35 Issue 9, p637 

    The article discusses the role of respiratory viruses in the pathogenesis of pediatric asthma. It states that the correlation of the common cold with asthma dates from way back. Though there is no clear basis on this, the availability of powerful detection methods like polymerase chain reaction...

  • Urbanisation is associated with prevalence of childhood asthma in diverse, small rural communities in Ecuador. Rodriguez, Alejandro; Vaca, Maritza; Oviedo, Gisela; Erazo, Silvia; Chico, Martha E.; Teles, Carlos; Barreto, Mauricio L.; Rodrigues, Laura C.; Cooper, Philip J. // Thorax;Dec2011, Vol. 66 Issue 12, p1043 

    Background Studies conducted in transitional communities from Africa and Asia have pointed to the process of urbanisation as being responsible for the increase in asthma prevalence in developing regions. In Latin America, there are few published data available on the potential impact of...

  • Asthma exacerbations 1: Epidemiology. Johnston, N. W.; Sears, M. R. // Thorax;Aug2006, Vol. 61 Issue 8, p722 

    Asthma exacerbations may be triggered by a number of atmospheric and domiciliary environmental factors as well as by those encountered in schools and workplaces. The majority of exacerbations, particularly in children, coincide with respiratory viral infections, most commonly rhinovirus. As most...

  • Rhinovirus Viremia. Deresinski, Stan // Clinical Infectious Diseases;1/1/2006, Vol. 42 Issue 1, preceding p1 

    This article presents information on the disease Rhinovirus Viremia. Rhinoviruses cause upper respiratory tract infection, most commonly manifested as the common cold. Viremia has been detected by culture techniques in the blood of just a few patients to date. This study identifies rhinovirus...

  • Presence of rhinovirus infections in children a predictor for asthma later in life. Rachelefsky, Gary S.; Southall, Jennifer // Infectious Diseases in Children;May2008, Vol. 21 Issue 5, p42 

    The article discusses a study on the connection between rhinovirus infection and asthma. According to the study presented by Dr. Robert F. Lemanske Jr. at the American Academy of Asthma, Allergy and Immunology 2008 Annual Meeting in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, rhinovirus infections in children...

  • The Relationship between Telomere Length and Mortality in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). Jee Lee; Sandford, Andrew J.; Connett, John E.; Jin Yan; Tammy Mui; Yuexin Li; Daley, Denise; Anthonisen, Nicholas R.; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Man, S. F. Paul; Sin, Don D. // PLoS ONE;Apr2012, Vol. 7 Issue 4, p1 

    Some have suggested that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a disease of accelerated aging. Aging is characterized by shortening of telomeres. The relationship of telomere length to important clinical outcomes such as mortality, disease progression and cancer in COPD is unknown....

  • Editor's Commentary.  // Respiratory Care;Dec2008, Vol. 53 Issue 12, p1625 

    The article discusses various reports published within the issue, including one on the use of tioropium in maintenance treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OCPD), one on the importance of asthma education interventions for parents of children with asthma, and one on the...

  • Treating Exacerbations of Asthma in Children: The Role of Systemic Corticosteroids. South, Mike; Rachelefsky, Gary // Internet Journal of Pediatrics & Neonatology;2005, Vol. 5 Issue 1, p35 

    This article focuses on a study whose objective was to review the use of systemic corticosteroids to treat recurrent, acute asthma episodes in children, with a focus on the role of oral corticosteroids. A comprehensive review of the literature was performed. Early treatment of acute asthma...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics