TITLE

Supreme Court Limits Protection of Public Employee Speech

AUTHOR(S)
Barran, Paula A.
PUB. DATE
April 2006
SOURCE
Venulex Legal Summaries;2006 Q2, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Law
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses about the extent of First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution on the statements delivered by public employees in pursuant to their official duties. It notes that the First Amendment does not cover such statements. The Amendment defends the rights of a public employee to speak as a citizen regarding public issues. Public employees who are speaking as part of their duties are not exempted from employer discipline and do not have any protection under the First Amendment.
ACCESSION #
23996372

 

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