TITLE

Reverse remodelling in heart failure with cardiac resynchronisation therapy

AUTHOR(S)
St John Sutton, M.; Keane, M. G.
PUB. DATE
February 2007
SOURCE
Heart;Feb2007, Vol. 93 Issue 2, p167
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This review examines the use of cardiac resynchronisation therapy (CRT) for chronic, severe, systolic heart failure. Left ventricular (LV) remodelling is the final common pathway of systolic heart failure and portends a poor prognosis. It is characterised by progressive LV dilatation, deterioration of ventricular contractile function and distortion of LV cavity shape. The LV remodelling process is triggered by prolonged pressure or volume overload, loss of contracting myocytes from myocardial infarction, genetic abnormalities of contractile proteins or exposure to cardiotoxic agents. Current therapeutic strategies for systolic heart failure aim to slow or halt the remodelling process. ‘Reverse remodelling’ is a relatively new concept, where progressive LV dilatation and deterioration in contractile function are not simply arrested, but partially reversed. Cardiac resynchronisation therapy is a novel and effective treatment for systolic heart failure, and is associated with reverse remodelling of the LV.
ACCESSION #
23912808

 

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