TITLE

Pulmonary atelectasis manifested after induction of anesthesia: a contribution of sinobronchial syndrome?

AUTHOR(S)
Igarashi, Ayuko; Amagasa, Sumio; Oda, Shinya; Yokoo, Noriko
PUB. DATE
February 2007
SOURCE
Journal of Anesthesia;2007, Vol. 21 Issue 1, p66
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
A 31-year-old man underwent general anesthesia for sinus surgery. Anesthesia was induced with midazolam and butorphanol, and an endotracheal tube was orally placed with a bronchoscope, due to difficulty with temporomandibular joint opening. Ventilation difficulty and increased peak inspiratory pressure were noticed shortly after tracheal intubation, and bronchoscopy was performed for diagnosis. The bronchi were filled with a clear mucous secretion. Removal of the secretion improved respiration and decreased the peak inspiratory pressure. A chest roentgenogram taken prior to extubation showed right upper lobe atelectasis. A diagnosis of sinobronchial syndrome was made postoperatively. The etiology of the acutely developed atelectasis was unclear. However, the latent syndrome may have induced excessive airway secretion with stimuli such as endotracheal intubation.
ACCESSION #
23905441

 

Related Articles

  • Fiberoptic Intubation as a Boon in Limited Mouth Opening Surgeries. Basha, Salman; Srinath, N.; Dutt, Sunil // World Journal of Dentistry;Oct2011, Vol. 2 Issue 4, p350 

    Surgery of temporomandibular joint ankylosis under general anesthesia poses a great challenge to anesthesiologists. This surgery falls in the category of difficult intubation as direct vocal cord visualization is difficult due to an inability to open the mouth. The present case report suggests...

  • How to avoid the Aintree Intubation Catheter getting stuck inside the LMA. Holldack, H. J. // Anaesthesia & Intensive Care;May2016, Vol. 44 Issue 3, p429 

    A letter to the editor in response to the article "Failure of intubation with Aintree intubation catheter via Size 3 Unique LMA" by N. Purcell and K. S. Lim in the previous issue is presented.

  • The effect of gynecologic laparoscopy on propofol concentrations administered by the target-controlled infusion system. Takizawa, Daisuke; Hiraoka, Haruhiko; Sato, Eri; Aso, Toshio; Aso, Chizu; Kunimoto, Fumio; Goto, Fumio // Journal of Anesthesia;2006, Vol. 20 Issue 1, p57 

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of gynecologic laparoscopy on propofol concentrations administered by the target-controlled infusion (TCI) system. Thirteen patients undergoing gynecologic laparoscopy (intraabdominal pressure of 10 mmHg) were enrolled in this study. Anesthesia...

  • An interesting-and unexpected-use of the GlideScope. Berkow, Lauren C.; Petrovic, Michelle A. // Internet Journal of Anesthesiology;2009, Vol. 20 Issue 1, p3 

    The use of the GlideScope for endotracheal intubation has been well documented in the literature. This is a case report of detection of a misplaced cricothyrotomy tube during GlideScope intubation.

  • Intubating laryngeal mask airway as an independent ventilatory and intubation device. A comparison between supine, right lateral and left lateral. Panwar, Mamta; Bharadwaj, Avnish; Chauhan, Gaurav; Kalita, Drubajyoti // Korean Journal of Anesthesiology;Oct2013, Vol. 65 Issue 4, p306 

    Background: Sudden loss of airway in patients in the lateral position has always been proven to be difficult to manage with conventional laryngoscopy. We performed a randomized controlled trial to prove the success rate of ventilation and intubation in the lateral position via intubating...

  • Comparison of intubating laryngeal mask airway and Bullard laryngoscope for oro-tracheal intubation in adult patients with simulated limitation of cervical movements. A. Nileshwar; A. Thudamaladinne // BJA: The British Journal of Anaesthesia;Jul2007, Vol. 99 Issue 2, p292 

    : Background Intubation of a patient with limited cervical spine movement or in whom movement of the cervical spine is not desirable is always a challenge even to the most experienced anaesthesiologist. The intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA) and the Bullard laryngoscope (BL) are two...

  • Awake intubation using the Airway Scope. Hirabayashi, Yoshihiro; Seo, Norimasa // Journal of Anesthesia;2007, Vol. 21 Issue 4, p529 

    The article offers information on the Airway Scope, and describes its use in nine cases of awake intubation. The Airway Scope is a rigid videolaryngoscope for trancheal intubation that permits a non-line-of sight view of the airway. Its blade has two side channels parallel to the fiberoptic...

  • How to avoid the Aintree Intubation Catheter getting stuck inside the LMA. Holldack, H J // Anaesthesia & Intensive Care;May2016, Vol. 44 Issue 3, p428 

    A letter to the editor in response to the article "Failure of intubation with Aintree intubation catheter via Size 3 Unique LMA" by N. Purcell and K. S. Lim in the previous issue is presented.

  • The association between sedation practices and duration of mechanical ventilation in intensive care. JARMAN, A. M.; DUKE, G. J.; READE, M. C.; CASAMENTO, A. // Anaesthesia & Intensive Care;May2013, Vol. 41 Issue 3, p311 

    The article discusses an analysis of 2,102 consecutive mechanically ventilated intensive care unit (ICU) patients from 2002-2010 at a Melbourne, Victoria, hospital to determine if propofol was related to shorter duration of mechanical ventilation (MV) than midazolam. Results show a drop in the...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of THE LIBRARY OF VIRGINIA

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics