TITLE

WHAT IS A "SEARCH" WITHIN THE MEANING OF THE FOURTH AMENDMENT?

AUTHOR(S)
Clancy, Thomas K.
PUB. DATE
November 2006
SOURCE
Albany Law Review;2006, Vol. 70 Issue 1, p1
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the definition of the term "search" within the Fourth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution. It examines the historical context of the Fourth Amendment, with emphasis on the physical intrusions that animated its adoption. It details the Supreme Court's treatment of the concept of search, cataloging both physical and non-physical governmental activities. It proposes that any intrusion with the purpose of obtaining physical evidence or information should be considered a search.
ACCESSION #
23874835

 

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