TITLE

McMaster PLUS: A Cluster Randomized Clinical Trial of an Intervention to Accelerate Clinical Use of Evidence-Based Information from Digital Libraries

AUTHOR(S)
Haynes, R. Brian; Holland, Jennifer; Cotol, Chris; McKinlay, R. James; Wilczynski, Nancy L.; Walters, Leslie A.; Jedras, Dawn; Parrish, Rick; McKibbon, K. Ann; Garg, Amit; Walter, Stephen D.
PUB. DATE
November 2006
SOURCE
Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association;Nov/Dec2006, Vol. 13 Issue 6, p593
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Background: Physicians have difficulty keeping up with new evidence from medical research. Methods: We developed the McMaster Premium LiteratUre Service (PLUS), an internet-based addition to an existing digital library, which delivered quality- and relevance-rated medical literature to physicians, matched to their clinical disciplines. We evaluated PLUS in a cluster-randomized trial of 203 participating physicians in Northern Ontario, comparing a Full-Serve version (that included alerts to new articles and a cumulative database of alerts) with a Self-Serve version (that included a passive guide to evidence-based literature). Utilization of the service was the primary trial end-point. Results: Mean logins to the library rose by 0.77 logins/month/user (95% CI 0.43, 1.11) in the Full-Serve group compared with the Self-Serve group. The proportion of Full-Serve participants who utilized the service during each month of the study period showed a sustained increase during the intervention period, with a relative increase of 57% (95% CI 12, 123) compared with the Self-Serve group. There were no differences in these proportions during the baseline period, and following the crossover of the Self-Serve group to Full-Serve, the Self-Serve group's usage became indistinguishable from that of the Full-Serve group (relative difference 4.4 (95% CI-23.7, 43.0). Also during the intervention and crossover periods, measures of self-reported usefulness did not show a difference between the 2 groups. Conclusion: A quality- and relevance-rated online literature service increased the utilization of evidence-based information from a digital library by practicing physicians.
ACCESSION #
23844570

 

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