TITLE

COGNITIVE RADIOS SOLVE A HOST OF PROBLEMS

AUTHOR(S)
Donovan, John
PUB. DATE
January 2007
SOURCE
Portable Design;Jan2007, Vol. 13 Issue 1, p8
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article offers information about the cognitive radio. According to the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, cognitive radio is a radio transmitter/receiver designed to detect the use of radio spectrum and to jump into and out of that frequency range without interfering with the transmissions of others. It can also learn from other cognitive radios or by observing use patterns from their operators. Cognitive radio has enough built-in intelligence to communicate on a machine-to-machine level and to form ad hoc networks. The U.S. Federal Communications Commission and the European regulators recognize the potential of cognitive radio to help increase spectrum efficiency.
ACCESSION #
23769445

 

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