TITLE

The Changing Nature of Internal Probes

AUTHOR(S)
Levy, Michael N.; Spafford, Michael L.
PUB. DATE
January 2007
SOURCE
Investment Dealers' Digest;1/15/2007, Vol. 73 Issue 2, p22
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the modification of internal investigations which senior financial executives play important role in order to reveal wrongdoing of firms and give that information to government regulators in the U.S. Since the rise in allegations of wrongdoing, corporations established internal investigations. The author suggested that financial executives must focus on the preserving documents, managing business and leaving internal investigations to the lawyers during internal probes.
ACCESSION #
23768854

 

Related Articles

  • Executive Order 13271--Establishment of the Corporate Fraud Task Force. Bush, George W. // Weekly Compilation of Presidential Documents;7/15/2002, Vol. 38 Issue 28, p1162 

    Presents the text of the executive order 13271 issued by U.S. President George W. Bush on July 9, 2002 which deals with the establishment of the Corporate Fraud Task Force.

  • PRSA SURVEY ADDRESSES CORPORATE SCANDALS.  // Public Relations Tactics;Nov2002, Vol. 9 Issue 11, p3 

    Reports on a survey which states that punishment is the key to reducing corporate scandals in the United States. Penalties recommended by respondents for chief executive officers who make false statements; Percentage of respondents who view the annual report as a credible source of information.

  • Sterling of Pa. Cites 'Scheme' at Unit. McGeer, Bonnie // American Banker;5/25/2007, Vol. 172 Issue 101, p20 

    The article reports on news pertaining to Sterling Financial Corporation, of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, during 2007. The author focuses on changes that have been made to the financial institution's earnings report. The changes were made after the company discovered evidence of fraud in its...

  • The Cutting Edge. Levine, Bernard // Electronic News;7/22/2002, Vol. 48 Issue 30, p8 

    Calls for the prosecution and imprisonment of corporate offenders to restore integrity in the business sector in the U.S. Impact of corporate crime on businesspeople; Debate over capital punishment.

  • END RUN AT ENRON. Toobin, Jeffrey // New Yorker;10/27/2003, Vol. 79 Issue 32, p48 

    Analyzes the corporate scandal that involved the United States-based energy company, Enron Corp. Reasons why the company's executive may never face criminal charges; Crimes committed by the company; Implication of the issue on the country's corporate environment; Laws governing corporate...

  • SARs Make the Difference in Apprehending Criminals.  // Bank Security Report;Jan2010, Vol. 39 Issue 1, p3 

    The article reports on crime cases released by the U.S. Financial Crimes Enforcement Network's (FinCEN) in which the apprehension and prosecution of a crime began with a filing of Suspicious Activity Reports (SARs) by a financial institution. One case involves two defendants who admitted that...

  • THE SEC TURNS THE SCREWS ON 'GATEKEEPERS' Loomis, Carol J. // Fortune International (Europe);4/18/2005, Vol. 151 Issue 7, p17 

    Offers a look at the pressure placed on corporations by the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Culpability of executives who are in a place to detect fraud and who do not move forcefully to prevent it; Investigation of Time Warner and its subsidiary America Online; Report...

  • THE SEC TURNS THE SCREWS ON 'GATEKEEPERS' Loomis, Carol J. // Fortune;4/18/2005, Vol. 151 Issue 8, p38 

    Offers a look at the pressure placed on corporations by the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Culpability of executives who are in a place to detect fraud and who do not move forcefully to prevent it; Investigation of Time Warner and its subsidiary America Online; Report...

  • Wall Street's trust fund is tapped out. Colvin, Geoffrey // Fortune International (Europe);5/26/2003, Vol. 147 Issue 10, p17 

    Comments on major Wall Street firms accused of paying one another to issue positive so-called research about clients. The banks did not admit or deny the allegations, though news accounts quoted industry insiders acknowledging the practice. The enforcers' main charges about investment-banking...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics