TITLE

Canadian factories ready to fight back

AUTHOR(S)
Knell, Michael J.
PUB. DATE
January 2007
SOURCE
Furniture/Today;1/8/2007, Vol. 31 Issue 18, p22
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents an overview of the Canadian furniture trade in 2006. The reasons are stated to be the strong Canadian dollar made Canadian products more expensive and imports cheaper. The article mentions that furniture factory shipments in all categories fell by 7.2% and shipments to domestic market fell by 4.8% in the first nine months of 2006. The article mentions that Canadian manufacturers are changing their strategies to remain competitive in terms of higher quality.
ACCESSION #
23638586

 

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