TITLE

For Charlie Rock, No Hero's Welcome

AUTHOR(S)
Perry, Alex
PUB. DATE
April 2003
SOURCE
Time International (South Pacific Edition);4/7/2003, Issue 13, p47
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on Charlie Rock and other units of the U.S. Army that are posted in the deserts of Iraq. They guard the roads in the desert and fight the persistent Iraqi resistance. Unlike other units, Charlie Rock is not getting the support from the local civilians of Iraq. Instead, Iraqis in the desert are helping the movement of Iraqi troops and armed vehicles, increasing difficulties for the units posted there.
ACCESSION #
23555120

 

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