TITLE

An Acoustic Analysis of the Development of CV Coarticulation: A Case Study

AUTHOR(S)
Sussman, Harvey M.; Duder, Celeste
PUB. DATE
October 1999
SOURCE
Journal of Speech, Language & Hearing Research;Oct1999, Vol. 42 Issue 5, p1080
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Provides information on a study which analyzed stop consonant-vowel productions from babbling to meaningful speech in a child. Transcriptional and acoustic analyses of babbling; Assessment of segmental autonomy; Spectrographic and reliability analysis.
ACCESSION #
2353710

 

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