TITLE

Wet wrap bandages for 4 weeks did not differ from topical ointments but increased skin infections in paediatric atopic eczema

AUTHOR(S)
Hindley, D.; Galloway, G.; Murray, J.
PUB. DATE
December 2006
SOURCE
Archives of Disease in Childhood;Dec2006 Supplement, Vol. 91, p123
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents the study on the effect of wet wrap bandages on children with atopic eczema in Great Britain. Compared to topical ointments, wet wrap bandages led to an increase in skin infections. The study shows that patients who use wet wrap bandages require more antibiotics than those who use ointment.
ACCESSION #
23528947

 

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