TITLE

Space: Our Ticket to Survival

AUTHOR(S)
Johnson, Paul
PUB. DATE
December 2006
SOURCE
Forbes Asia;12/11/2006, Vol. 2 Issue 21, p18
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses areas wherein intervention and leadership of the U.S. government will be beneficial to the economy. Regarding nuclear power, the government must impel its use over other fuels such as petroleum. Petroleum products tend to vary with prices and lead to several political problems. Outer space is an important factor that the government has overlooked. Large-scale natural disasters can destroy the world along with the human race and the government must draw plans such as a workable planetwide evacuation.
ACCESSION #
23515460

 

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