TITLE

GASTROINTESTINAL PARASITES OF CRITICALLY ENDANGERED PRIMATES ENDEMIC TO TANA RIVER, KENYA: TANA RIVER RED COLOBUS (PROCOLOBUS RUFOMITRATUS) AND CRESTED MANGABEY (CERCOCEBUS GALERITUS)

AUTHOR(S)
Mbora, David N. M.; Munene, Elephas
PUB. DATE
October 2006
SOURCE
Journal of Parasitology;Oct2006, Vol. 92 Issue 5, p928
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the fecal egg counts of gastrointestinal parasites of endangered primates endemic to the forest of Tana River, Kenya, to quantify the prevalence of gastrointestinal parasites. The crested mangabey are predicted to have higher prevalence of parasites than the Tana River red colobus because they are terrestial omnivores.
ACCESSION #
23492099

 

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