TITLE

Try Diplomacy, Not War

AUTHOR(S)
Zedillo, Ernesto; Yew, Lee Kuan; Johnson, Paul
PUB. DATE
November 2006
SOURCE
Forbes Asia;11/13/2006, Vol. 2 Issue 19, p20
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the importance of diplomacy in solving the conflict in the Middle East. Aside from material and human losses, the legacy of the war between Israel and Hezbollah in Lebanon seems to be even more resentment and hatred among all the foes. A solution to the conflict requires skillful diplomatic and material support from the U.S., the European Union, Russia and the United Nations.
ACCESSION #
23320108

 

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