TITLE

Printing

PUB. DATE
January 2006
SOURCE
Career Guide to Industries;2006/2007, p76
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the contributions of the printing industry to the economic activity of the U.S. The average nonsupervisory workers in the printing and related support activities industry work for about 38.4 hours per week. Production occupations make up 53 percent of the industry employment with printing machine operators accounting for the most employment. Salary employment in the printing and related support activities industry is projected to decline.
ACCESSION #
23274848

 

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