TITLE

Worms at Work: Horrible or Helpful?

PUB. DATE
December 2006
SOURCE
Weekly Reader - Edition 2;12/1/2006, Vol. 76 Issue 12, p3
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the function of worms from garbage. Red worms that are found in garbage bins feed off leftover foods and create waste materials that can be used as fertilizer, helping plants to grow rich. Workers from California recycling offices are sometimes grossed out by the worms but others are not.
ACCESSION #
23225178

 

Related Articles

  • organic approach. Garnham, Peter // Horticulture;Oct/Nov2010, Vol. 107 Issue 7, p15 

    The article offers information on sheet composting. It states that sheet composting helps all forms of soil life such as beneficial bacteria, beetles as well as earthworms. It mentions that scraps of vegetable waste can be tossed through the winter, and by spring, the sheet of compostable...

  • Global worming. Phillips, Debra // Entrepreneur;May96, Vol. 24 Issue 5, p23 

    Reports that worm composting, which is the process by which worms turn garbage into compost, will be the next trend in recycling. Prediction by Rick Best.

  • An Analysis of the Horticulture Industry as a Potential Value-Added Market for Compost. Walker, P.; Williams, D.; Waliczek, T. M. // Compost Science & Utilization;Winter2006, Vol. 14 Issue 1, p23 

    A major barrier to adoption of composting by the livestock industry is a lack of information regarding the relative economic advantages and disadvantages for producing and marketing compost. The ten markets evaluated in this research are seen as typical markets for horticultural products or...

  • CHARACTERIZING THE COMPOSTING INDUSTRY. Coker, Craig; Goldstein, Nora // BioCycle;Dec2004, Vol. 45 Issue 12, p20 

    Reports on the expansion of the composting industry in the United States. Increase of the sales of compost and compost-amended products; Recruitment of government officials interested in increasing recycling rates; Promotion of legislation which benefits the composting industry.

  • EVOLUTION OF THE COMPOST WINDROW TURNER. GOLDSTEIN, NORA // BioCycle;Jul2009, Vol. 50 Issue 7, p44 

    The article relates the evolution and history of windrow composting in the U.S. It cites several articles published in several sources which indicated that early machines and practices of composing across the U.S. These include the article in the "Compost Science" titled "Oregon Farmers Save...

  • REGIONAL ROUNDUP.  // BioCycle;Jul2004, Vol. 45 Issue 7, p18 

    Presents news briefs pertaining to composting and organics recycling in the United States as of July 2004. Testing of solid effluent from digested poultry litter as fertilizer; Los Angeles Department of Water and Power's development of a Renewable Portfolio Standard to increase its share of...

  • A Four-Year Study on Influence of Biosolids/MSW Cocompost Application in Less Productive Soils In Alberta: Nutrient Dynamics. Zhang, M.; Heaney, D.; Henriquez, B.; Solberg, E.; Bittner, E. // Compost Science & Utilization;Winter2006, Vol. 14 Issue 1, p68 

    Composting municipal solid waste and biosolids and applying it on arable land have become an alternative way to treat waste in large municipalities in North America. However, cost of compost transportation and application constrains the compost use on the land further away from where it is...

  • The Physical, Chemical and Microbial Characteristics of Biodegradable Municipal Waste Derived Composts. Dimambro, M. E.; Lillywhite, R. D.; Rahn, C. R. // Compost Science & Utilization;Autumn2007, Vol. 15 Issue 4, p243 

    A comparative study of the physical, chemical and microbial properties of 12 composts sourced from United Kingdom commercial composting plants was carried out. The aim was to ascertain whether these composts could be used as growing media or for application to agricultural land. The composts...

  • Correlation of X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometry And Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy for Elemental Determination In Composted Products. Weindorf, D. C.; Sarkar, R.; Dia, M.; Wang, H.; Chang, Q.; Haggard, B.; McWhirt, A.; Wooten, A. // Compost Science & Utilization;Spring2008, Vol. 16 Issue 2, p79 

    The elemental composition of compost products was determined via inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP) and x-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF). Correlations between the two methodologies were evaluated on individual elemental basis to determine if XRF provides results...

Share

Read the Article

Courtesy of VIRGINIA BEACH PUBLIC LIBRARY AND SYSTEM

Sorry, but this item is not currently available from your library.

Try another library?
Sign out of this library

Other Topics