TITLE

Why the long-term view is vital

AUTHOR(S)
Richardson, John
PUB. DATE
November 2006
SOURCE
ICIS Chemical Business;11/13/2006, Vol. 1 Issue 43, p18
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article explores the issues addressed at the Ethanol & Biofuels Asia 2006 conference held in Singapore. A bigger issue, accepted, at least publicly, by many delegates, was the need to break the link between food and fuel production. With biodiesel, though, jatropha, a crop that grows on marginal, underused agricultural land, was highlighted as being of potential. The alternative to using agricultural land might be clearing more virgin forests for palm-oil plantations.
ACCESSION #
23194752

 

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