TITLE

Toys 'R' Us pitch: Kids find joy shopping here

AUTHOR(S)
Chura, Hillary; Petrecca, Laura
PUB. DATE
September 1999
SOURCE
Advertising Age;9/27/1999, Vol. 70 Issue 40, p91
SOURCE TYPE
Trade Publication
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
This article reports on the television advertising campaign created by Leo Burnett USA for Toys "R" Us, as of September 1999. The campaign is the first from Leo Burnett, which won the $75 million account in May 1999. The advertisements started on kid's cable programming. The commercials feature ethereal music and whimsical themes. The strategy is to convince parents of the wonderment Toys "R" Us can provide their progeny. The theme line is, It's all for them.
ACCESSION #
2308800

 

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