TITLE

Aristophanes' Wealth: ancient alternative medicine and its modern survival

AUTHOR(S)
Koutouvidis, N.; Papamichael, E.; Fotiadou, A.
PUB. DATE
November 1996
SOURCE
Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine;Nov1996, Vol. 89 Issue 11, p651
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The miraculous cure of the blind god Plutos ('Wealth') in Aristophanes' play illuminates some of the reasons why people have sought help in alternative medicine over the ages. Apart from limitations of conventional medicine these factors can be social, political, religious, psychological, and scientific. Alternative medicine may function in a complementary way to the conventional. Nevertheless, an overestimation of its therapeutic potentials by the public can lead to the domination of irrationalism, all in the name of liberation from the shackles of a mechanistic rationalism.
ACCESSION #
23082249

 

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