TITLE

HOW TO SATISFY A SPIN-STER EVERY TIME

AUTHOR(S)
Hanson, Christopher
PUB. DATE
July 1993
SOURCE
Columbia Journalism Review;Jul/Aug1993, Vol. 32 Issue 2, p17
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article discusses the basic elements of a profile of a public officer. The profile should be presented from the point of view of the subject. The article should quote friends, relatives, political allies, and admirers of the subject as extensively as possible. It should also should make the subject look good even as he or she is shown doing things that make reporters look bad. In addition, the writer must choose words carefully to play up the significance or political potency of the person under discussion.
ACCESSION #
22984249

 

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