TITLE

Inhalation devices and propellants

PUB. DATE
December 1999
SOURCE
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;11/30/99 Supplement, Vol. 161, pS44
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the recommendations for the use of inhalation devices and propellants for asthma in children and adults. The article offers guidelines for the use of inhalation devices including pressurized metered-dose inhalers, metered-dose inhalers with spacers, dry-powder inhalers and wet nebulizers. It also discusses the limitations and potential problems of each device. The bioequivalence and side-effects of inhaled medications is discussed.
ACCESSION #
22957929

 

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