TITLE

CMPA `amazed' as number of new legal actions against MDs declines in '98

AUTHOR(S)
Sullivan, Patrick
PUB. DATE
September 1999
SOURCE
CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association Journal;9/21/99, Vol. 161 Issue 6, p741
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Discusses the results of a meeting by the Canadian Medical Protective Association (CMPA) that Canadian physicians' malpractice fees are declining because of a drop in civil lawsuits. How United States doctors are more often sued for malpractice; Need for reform because of rising fees; Shrinking health care resources placing doctors in medicolegal risk.
ACCESSION #
2291195

 

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