TITLE

Osteochondroma of C7 vertebra presenting as compressive myelopathy in a patient with nonhereditary (nonfamilial/sporadic) multiple exostoses

AUTHOR(S)
Maheshwari, Aditya V.; Jain, Anil K.; Dhammi, Ish K.
PUB. DATE
November 2006
SOURCE
Archives of Orthopaedic & Trauma Surgery;Nov2006, Vol. 126 Issue 10, p654
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
Osteochondromas are most commonly found in the appendicular skeleton. They occur less frequently in the spine and compression of the spinal cord is very rare. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of an osteochondroma arising from C7 vertebra presenting with compressive myelopathy in a patient with nonhereditary multiple exostoses. Our purpose is to report this rare presentation and its successful management, and to highlight the clinico-radiological features of this treatable condition. A 20-year-old male with nonhereditary exostoses presented with gradual onset weakness in bilateral lower limbs, which had rapidly progressed to complete paraplegia over 1 month. The tumor was effectively treated by surgical excision along with spinal decompression. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological evidence complemented by clinico-radiological studies. There has been a complete functional recovery without any evidence of recurrence at last follow-up at 2 years. Compressive myelopathy due to an osteochondroma arising from C7 vertebra in a case with nonhereditary multiple exostoses is being reported for the first time. Both CT and MRI demonstrated the origin, size, extent and relationship of the tumor to the vertebral and neural elements. Complete recovery of functions after surgical decompression was achieved in this case. An osteochondroma of spine must always be considered in all patients with multiple exostoses who have spine pain or develop neural deficit.
ACCESSION #
22896926

 

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