TITLE

Rest Stop Rattlers

PUB. DATE
October 2006
SOURCE
New York State Conservationist;Oct2006, Vol. 61 Issue 2, p29
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article reports on the snake sightings that occurred which prompted the closing of a rest area near Corning, just west of Exit 43 on Interstate 86 in the New York State. Public Works employees found two timber rattlesnakes--the state's largest venomous snake--sunning themselves the area's picnic tables. The Department of Transportation immediately closed down the rest area while DEC removed the rattlesnakes; DOT decided to reopen the area later that week.
ACCESSION #
22895080

 

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