TITLE

Notes and Comment

PUB. DATE
February 1961
SOURCE
New Yorker;2/4/1961, Vol. 36 Issue 51, p23
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article examines the significance of good oratory skills and articulation in politics, specifically in the United States citing the skills of President John F. Kennedy. Both Aristotle and Cicero, a theorist and a theorizing orator, believed that rhetoric could be an art to the extent that the orator was first a logician and second a psychologist with an appreciation and understanding of words. Political oratory is esteemed most highly compared with the forensic and display types.
ACCESSION #
22781743

 

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