TITLE

Spontaneous rupture of external iliac vein

AUTHOR(S)
Elliot, D.; Ware, C. C.
PUB. DATE
June 1982
SOURCE
Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine;Jun1982, Vol. 75 Issue 6, p477
SOURCE TYPE
Academic Journal
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents a case of a 72-year-old Caucasian woman who was diagnosed with severe lower abdominal pain. Examinations were done and medical results indicated a tender swelling in the right iliac fossa. However, there was no evidence at a surgical incision of trauma to the interior abdominal wall and the vessels were macroscopically normal.
ACCESSION #
22778213

 

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