TITLE

XIX--PORTLAND, ME

AUTHOR(S)
Hamburger, Philip
PUB. DATE
October 1960
SOURCE
New Yorker;10/8/1960, Vol. 36 Issue 34, p177
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article describes Portland, Maine, with a population of 77,634, and an altitude of 61 feet above sea level. Portland is known for its poet, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. Vistas of the sea and sky, of coves, of islands in the bay, and of lighthouses, play an important role in steadying the people of Portland. The Portland Head Light, at Cape Elizabeth, is the most photographed lighthouse in the world.
ACCESSION #
22768609

 

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