TITLE

CONVERSATION WITH MAX IV--PARTITO MA NON ARRIVATO

AUTHOR(S)
Behrman, S. N.
PUB. DATE
February 1960
SOURCE
New Yorker;2/27/1960, Vol. 36 Issue 2, p43
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article presents the author's experience of meeting with Max Beerbohm. He wanted to talk to Max so he asked his driver Charlie to ask Max to meet him. He brought gifts for Max and his secretary, Miss Elizabeth Jungmann. He learned from Jungmann that Max suffers terribly from nightmares. He suggested to max that maybe a psychiatrist help him about his nightmares.
ACCESSION #
22757382

 

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