TITLE

Don't 'Brown' the Hispanics

AUTHOR(S)
Etzioni, Amitai
PUB. DATE
September 2006
SOURCE
Nieman Reports;Fall2006, Vol. 60 Issue 3, p64
SOURCE TYPE
Periodical
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
The article focuses on the way journalists in the U.S. handle racial and ethnic identifications in news coverage. Print and broadcast journalists alike often tend to incorporate Hispanics into various racial categories which makes comparisons with other groups dubious from the start. Hispanics are not a race. Instead, they should be more considered an ethnic group. But they are rarely seen as that. Journalists have dealt with this challenge in several ways. Each, however, tends to make little sense for various reasons and comes with surprising sociological implications. To deal with this identity dilemma, it is suggested therefore that journalists drop racial categories and use instead ethnic categories based on the country of origin. Using such category recognize the empirical fact that countries of origin and ethnicity matters more than race.
ACCESSION #
22713831

 

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