TITLE

PATHETIC FALLACY

PUB. DATE
May 1995
SOURCE
Columbia Dictionary of Modern Literary & Cultural Criticism;1995, p221
SOURCE TYPE
Book
DOC. TYPE
Article
ABSTRACT
A definition of the term "pathetic fallacy" is presented. It refers to a literary convention in which human emotional qualities are attributed to natural phenomena that have no capacity for human feeling. Art critic John Ruskin coined the term pathetic fallacy which has been overused by the romantics. However, later critics have used the term descriptively wherein they abandoned its pejorative sense.
ACCESSION #
22450057

Tags: PERSONIFICATION in literature;  RUSKIN, John, 1819-1900;  CRITICISM;  LITERATURE;  DEFINITIONS

 

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